fc2ブログ

Uncharted Territory

自分が読んで興味深く感じた英文記事を中心に取り上げる予定です

RSS     Archives
 

TIMEを読むメリット

 
TIMEを読むメリットはYutaにとっては視野を広げてくれることにつきます。Adrienne Richという詩人を知ったのもTIMEのObituaryで、そこで紹介されていた彼女の言葉は強烈でした。すみませんがTIMEに関するコメントは以上です。。。

このエントリーの最後に以前のブログで訳したものを紹介させていただきますが、その一部が以下です。

Poetry is not a healing lotion, an emotional massage, a kind of linguistic aromatherapy. Neither is it a blueprint, nor an instruction manual, nor a billboard. There is no universal poetry, anyway, only poetries and poetics, and the streaming intertwining histories to which they belong.
詩は癒しのローションでも、心のマッサージでも、言語のアロマテラピーといったものではありません。それに、設計図でも、取扱説明書でも、看板でもないのです。普遍的な詩もありません。ただ、さまざまな詩と詩学があり、それらが属する歴史が絡み合いながら流れているだけなのです。

********

Poetry has the capacity in its own ways and by its own means to remind us of something we are forbidden to see, a forgotten future, a still uncreated site whose moral architecture is founded not on ownership and dispossession, torture and bribes, outcast and tribe, but on the continuous redefining of freedom.
詩は独自のやり方で、独自の手段で、私たちに思い起こさせてくれるのです。見るのを禁止されているものを、忘れ去られた未来を、未だに作られていない場所を。その場所での精神の構築物は、所有や略奪、拷問や賄賂、落後者や集団を基礎にするのではなく、絶え間なく自由を再定義することによってできているのです。



今週彼女の詩のアンソロジーが出るそうでNew Yorkerに書評が載っていました。書評というより彼女の人生と詩を振り返るものになっていますので冒頭の彼女の言葉にグッときた人は読んでみてください。

BOOKS JUNE 20, 2016 ISSUE
BOUNDARY CONDITIONS
Adrienne Rich’s collected poems.

By Dan Chiasson



以下の記事はアンソロジーに収載されているIntroductionを基にしたものだそうです。上記の詩はこのIntroductionの最後に紹介されているWhat Kind of Times Are Theseです。

MAY 12, 2016
Adrienne Rich’s Poetic Transformations

BY CLAUDIA RANKINE

詩のよさを味わうべきで政治的態度とはある程度切り離すべきだと思いますが、彼女の場合はその点は無視できないようです。いまでもハリウッドで女性格差が問題になっていますが、40年前はもっとひどかったのだろうと想像できます。現政権からの勲章を拒否する態度も肝がすわっていますね。

When “Diving into the Wreck” won the National Book Award, in 1974, Rich accepted the prize in solidarity with fellow nominees Alice Walker and Audre Lorde:
The statement I am going to read was prepared by three of the women nominated for the National Book Award for poetry, with the agreement that it would be read by whichever of us, if any, was chosen.
We, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Alice Walker, together accept this award in the name of all the women whose voices have gone and still go unheard in a patriarchal world, and in the name of those who, like us, have been tolerated as token women in this culture, often at great cost and in great pain. We believe that we can enrich ourselves more in supporting and giving to each other than by competing against each other; and that poetry—if it is poetry—exists in a realm beyond ranking and comparison. We symbolically join together here in refusing the terms of patriarchal competition and declaring that we will share this prize among us, to be used as best we can for women. We appreciate the good faith of the judges for this award, but none of us could accept this money for herself, nor could she let go unquestioned the terms on which poets are given or denied honor and livelihood in this world, especially when they are women. We dedicate this occasion to the struggle for self-determination of all women, of every color, identification, or derived class: the poet, the housewife, the lesbian, the mathematician, the mother, the dishwasher, the pregnant teen-ager, the teacher, the grandmother, the prostitute, the philosopher, the waitress, the women who will understand what we are doing here and those who will not understand yet; the silent women whose voices have been denied us, the articulate women who have given us strength to do our work.

Over twenty years later, in 1997, Rich declined the National Medal for the Arts, this country’s highest artistic honor, because she believed that “the very meaning of art, as I understand it, is incompatible with the cynical politics of this administration.” In her July 3rd letter to the Clinton Administration and Jane Alexander, the chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts, she wrote,
I want to clarify to you what I meant by my refusal. Anyone familiar with my work from the early sixties on knows that I believe in art’s social presence—as breaker of official silences, as voice for those whose voices are disregarded, and as a human birthright. In my lifetime I have seen the space for the arts opened by movements for social justice, the power of art to break despair. Over the past two decades I have witnessed the increasingly brutal impact of racial and economic injustice in our country.
There is no simple formula for the relationship of art to justice. But I do know that art—in my own case the art of poetry—means nothing if it simply decorates the dinner table of power which holds it hostage.

******
Adrienne Rich, Recipient Of The 2006 Medal For Distinguished Contribution To American Letters
Presented at the 2006 National Book Awards Ceremony and Dinner

November 15, 2006, New York Marriott Marquis, Times Square, New York, New York


イギリス浪漫派詩人シェリーのthe unacknowledged legislators of the worldという言葉を引いて、詩人が政治的であることは何らおかしくないことを語っていたり、ドイツの哲学者アドルノのNach Auschwitz ein Gedicht zu schreiben, ist barbarisch(英語ではTo write poetry after Auschwitz is barbalic.やWriting poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric.と訳されています)などにも触れていますが、ここでは詩について語っているところを取り上げます。添えた翻訳はYutaによるものなので、まゆつばでお願いします(汗)

I am both a poet and one of the everybodies of my country. I live in poetry and daily experience with manipulated fear, ignorance, cultural confusion, and social antagonism huddling together on the fault line of an empire. I hope never to idealize poetry. It has suffered enough from that. Poetry is not a healing lotion, an emotional massage, a kind of linguistic aromatherapy. Neither is it a blueprint, nor an instruction manual, nor a billboard. There is no universal poetry, anyway, only poetries and poetics, and the streaming intertwining histories to which they belong.

(私は詩人であるとともに我が国のごく普通の人間の一人です。私は詩の中で生きているとともに日常を経験しています。操作された恐怖、無知、文化的な混乱、社会の対立が一つの帝国の断層線沿ってせめぎ合っています。絶対に詩を理想化しないように願っています。すでにそのことで十分に苦しめられています。詩は癒しのローションでも、心のマッサージでも、言語のアロマテラピーといったものではありません。それに、設計図でも、取扱説明書でも、看板でもないのです。普遍的な詩もありません。ただ、さまざまな詩と詩学があり、それらが属する歴史が絡み合いながら流れているだけなのです。)

**********

In North America, poetry has been written off on other counts. It is not a mass-market product. It doesn't get sold on airport newsstands or in supermarket aisles. The actual consumption figures for poetry can't be quantified at the checkout counter. It’s too difficult for the average mind. It’s too elite, but the wealthy don’t bid for it at Sotheby's. It is, in short, redundant. This might be called the free market critique of poetry. There's actually an odd correlation between these ideas. Poetry is either inadequate, even immoral in the face of human suffering, or it's unprofitable, hence useless.

(北米では、詩は脇に追いやられてしまっています。大衆向けの製品ではないのです。詩は空港の雑誌売り場やスーパーの棚には売ってありません。詩の実際の消費量はレジでは計算できないのです。普通の人にとって理解するのはあまりに難しいのです。あまりにもエリート過ぎるのですが、裕福な人たちはサザビーで詩をオークションにかけたりしません。つまり、詩は余分なものなのです。これは自由市場による詩への批判と呼べるかもしれません。このような考えには奇妙な相関関係が確かにあります。詩は不適切で、人間の苦難の前では不道徳でさえあるか、利益のでない、つまり役に経たないものかのどちらかなのです。)

Either way, poets are advised to hang our heads or fold our tents. Yet, in fact, throughout the world, transfusions of poetic language can and do quite literally keep bodies and souls together and more. Because when poetry lays its hand on our shoulder, we can be to an almost physical degree touched and moved. The imagination’s roads open again, giving the lie to that slammed and bolted door, that razor-wired fence, that brute dictum. There is no alternative. Of course, like the consciousness behind it, behind any art, a poem can be deep or shallow, glib or visionary, prescient or stuck in an already lagging trendiness.

(どちらにしても、詩は首をつるか、店じまいをするように言われています。それでも、実際には、世界中で、詩の言葉を輸血することが文字通り精神と肉体をつなぎとめ、それ以上のことを可能にし、実際におこなっているのです。というのも詩が私たちの肩に手をまわしてくれれば、体が反応するのと同じように、私たちは心を打たれ、感動するのです。想像の道が再び開かれ、ピシャリと閉じて鍵をかけられたドアが、有刺鉄線のあるフェンスが、残忍な公式見解が嘘であることを暴くことになるのです。他に選択肢はありません。もちろん、詩の深層においては、いかなる芸術でもそうですが、詩は深くも浅くもなるし、軽薄にも先見性のあるものにもなるし、予見したものにも、すでに停滞したブームにとどまるものにもなります)

**********

Poetry has the capacity in its own ways and by its own means to remind us of something we are forbidden to see, a forgotten future, a still uncreated site whose moral architecture is founded not on ownership and dispossession, torture and bribes, outcast and tribe, but on the continuous redefining of freedom. That word now held in house arrest by the rhetoric of the free market. This ongoing future written-off over and over is still within view. All over the world its paths are being rediscovered and reinvented through collective action, through many kinds of art. And there's always that in poetry, which will not be grasped, which cannot be described, which survives our ardent attention, our critical theories, our classrooms, our late-night arguments. There's always (I'm quoting the poet-translator Americo Ferrari) an unspeakable where perhaps the nucleus of the living relation between the poem and the world resides.

(詩は独自のやり方で、独自の手段で、私たちに思い起こさせてくれるのです。見るのを禁止されているものを、忘れ去られた未来を、未だに作られていない場所を。その場所での精神の構築物は、所有や略奪、拷問や賄賂、落後者や集団を基礎にするのではなく、絶え間なく自由を再定義することによってできているのです。その言葉は今は自由市場の話術によって自宅軟禁されています。この進行中の未来は何度も何度もかき消されていますが、今でも視界にあります。世界中で、これらの道は共同作業を通して、多様な芸術を通して、再発見され、作り直されているところです。そして、いつだって、そのようなことが詩の中にあるのです。それは把握されない、描写できない、どんなに注意を払っても、批評理論でも、教室でも、夜遅くまでの議論でも捉えられないものなのです。いつでも(詩人で翻訳家であったAmerico Ferrariを引用します)詩と世界の間にある生き生きとして関係の核心部があるところには語りえないものがあるのでしょう。)

スポンサーサイト



Comment


    
プロフィール

Yuta

Author:Yuta
FC2ブログへようこそ!




最新トラックバック



FC2カウンター

検索フォーム



ブロとも申請フォーム

QRコード
QR