fc2ブログ

Uncharted Territory

自分が読んで興味深く感じた英文記事を中心に取り上げる予定です

RSS     Archives
 

村上春樹の新作への乗っかり企画

 
今月末に村上春樹の新作が発売されるようですが、それで思い出したニュースです。
村上春樹と小澤征爾との対談集が昨秋英訳されて出ていたんですよね。

ガーディアンで前書きと対談の一部を読むことができます。

Haruki Murakami and Seiji Ozawa talk music, art and creativity
One writes fiction, the other conducts an orchestra, but Murakami and Ozawa share a drive, determination – and a passion for music. They discuss the creative process, inspiration and the eclecticism of Mahler
Seiji Ozawa, left, and Ozawa Murakami.
Haruki Murakami, Seiji Ozawa

Saturday 5 November 2016 14.00 GMT

前書きの一部ですが、英語学習を今でも続けている人は同じマインドを持っているのではないでしょうか。

Secondly, we both maintain the same “hungry heart” we possessed in our youth, that persistent feeling that “this is not good enough”, that we must dig deeper, forge farther ahead. This is the major motif of our work and our lives. Observing Ozawa in action, I could feel the depth and intensity of the desire he brought to his work. He was convinced of his own rightness and proud of what he was doing, but not in the least satisfied with it. I could see he knew he should be able to make the music even better, even deeper, and he was determined to make it happen even as he struggled with the constraints of time and his own physical strength.

二つめは、今でも若い頃と同じハングリーな心を変わらず持ち続けていることだ。いや、これくらいでは足りない、もっと奥まで追求したい、もっと前に向かって進んでいきたい、というのが仕事をする上での、また生きる上での重要なモチーフになっている。小澤さんの言動を見ていると、その良い意味での(というか)欲深さをひしひしと感じることができた。自分が今やっていることに納得はしている。自負も持っている。しかしだからといって決して満足はしていない。もっと素晴らしいこと、もっと深いことが自分にはできるはずだ、という感触がある。そしてそれをなんとか−時間や体力という制約と闘いつつ−成し遂げなくてはならない、という決意がある。


ニューヨークタイムズの書評で面白いと思ったのは対談でもFact Checkしているところ。どうしても我々は有名人の話はそのまま聞いてしまいますよね。。

Review: ‘Absolutely on Music’ Gives a Maestro a Stage for Ideas
Books of The Times

By JAMES R. OESTREICH NOV. 21, 2016

There is much good, solid musical discussion and information here. But there are also too many muddled volleys off the top of the head, lacking the needed factual follow-up and correction.

In a conversation about the quality of the sound at Carnegie Hall, Mr. Ozawa recalls a live taping there of Brahms’s First Symphony with the Saito Kinen Orchestra in 2010: “When we recorded this,” he said, “I hadn’t been there for some time, and I’m pretty sure it changed in that time. It got a lot better.”

Mr. Murakami: “I heard it was renovated.”

Mr. Ozawa: “Oh, really? That makes sense.”

Mr. Ozawa led the Vienna Philharmonic in three concerts at Carnegie in 2004. “I remember then thinking that the sound had improved,” he says. “It certainly hadn’t when I was there with the Boston Symphony” some eight years before.

But this is all balderdash. The wholesale renovation of Carnegie took place in 1986, and the concrete left under the stage floor was removed in 1995. No changes significantly affecting the acoustics have been made since.

Yutaは音楽のことはサッパリですが、若い音楽家への教育について語っていた章からいくつかご紹介させてもらいます。対談の方が文章よりも英語がシンプルでわかりやすいですね。マンさんとはジュリアード出身のロバート・マンを指しています。小澤征爾が主催している音楽アカデミーで講師をなさっているようです。

村上「そういえば、マンさんはブレスのこともよく言ってましたね。人が歌うとき、どこかでブレスをしなくてはならない。でも弦楽器は不幸にして、ブレスをしなくてもいい。だからこそ、ブレスを意識して演奏しなくてはならないんだと。不幸にして、という表現が面白かったですね。それから彼はよく沈黙のことを言ってましたね。沈黙というのは、ただ音がない状態というんじゃないんだ。そこにちゃんと沈黙という音があるんだと」
小澤「ああ、それはね、日本の『間』という考え方と同じですね。雅楽とか琵琶とか尺八と同じです。それとすごく似ていますね。西洋音楽の楽譜にも、そういう間が書いてあるものもあります。でも書いていたいものもあるんです。マンさんはそういうところがよくわかっている人です」

MURAKAMI: Now that you mention it, Mann said a lot about the breath. When people sing, they have to take a breath as some point. But “unfortunately,” he said, string instruments don’t have to breath, so you have to keep the breath in mind as you play. That “unfortunately” was interesting. He also talked a lot about silence. Silence is not just the absence of sound: there is a sound called silence.
OZAWA: Ah, that’s the same thing as the Japanese idea of ma. The same concept comes up in gagaku, and in playing the biwa and the shakuhachi. It’s very much like that. This kind of ma is written into the score in some Western music, but there is also some in which it’s not written. Mann has a very good understanding of these things.

*********

小澤「指揮に関してもそうだし、教えることに関してもそうですね。こうあるべきだ、という型を用意していくんじゃなくて、何にも用意しないでいって、その場で相手を見て決めるというやり方です。相手がやっていることを見て、その場その場で対応していく。だから僕みたいな人間は教則本とか書けないですよね。相手が実際に目の前にいないと、言うことがないから」
村上「相手によって言うことが違ってくる。でもそういう人がいて、それと同時にマンさんのようにぴしっと揺らがない哲学を持った人がいて、そういうコンビネーションでものごとがうまく運んでいうんでしょうね」
小澤「そのとおりでしょうね」

OZAWA: Yes, in both my conducting and my teaching. I don’t approach either with preconceived ideas. I don’t prepare beforehand but decide on the spot when I see who I’m dealing with. I respond then and there when I see how they are handling things. Somebody like me could never write an instruction manual. I don’t have anything to say until I’ve got a musician right in front of me.
MURAKAMI: And then, depending on who that musician is, it changes what you say. It must be good for the students to have the two of you in combination: you, with your flexible approach, and Robert Mann, with his unwavering philosophy. I bet it works out very well.
OZAWA: Yes, I think so.

*********

小澤「(前略)一曲の練習にみっちり時間をかけることができます。今やっている練習なんかでもね、あれはもう相当深いところまでつっこんでやっています。練習というのは、やればやるほど難しさが出てくるんです」
村上「練習を積むにつれて、クリアすべき課題の難度がどんどん上がっていくということですね?」
小澤「そういうことです。どれだけ呼吸が合ってきても、やはりつながりがうまくいかないことがあります。音のニュアンスが僅かに違っているとか、リズムが僅かに合わないとか。それを時間変えて、ひとつひとつ細かいところまで煮詰めていける。だあら明日になると、演奏が一段階向上しています。そこでまたより高度なことを求めていく。そういうのをやっているとね、僕もうんと勉強になる」

OZAWA: … you can pour a lot of time into rehearsing each one. Take the rehearsals we’re doing now: we probe very deeply into each piece. And the more you rehearse, the more difficulties come to the surface.
MURAKAMI: You mean, the more time you spend rehearsing, the more difficult become the various hurdles that need to be cleared?
OZAWA: That’s right. You may get them to where they’re all breathing together, but still the parts are perfectly synced. The nuances of sound are a little off, say, or the rhythms are not quite together. So you put lots of time into refining each of these tiny details. That way, tomorrow’s performance should be at an even higher level. So then you demand even more from them. This process teachers me an awful lot.

そうそう今週のNew York TimesのBook ReviewでThe SympathizerやNothing Ever Diesのベトナム系作家Viet Thanh Nguyenが夕食会に呼びたい三人の作家に村上春樹を選んでました。

Viet Thanh Nguyen: By the Book
JAN. 30, 2017

You’re organizing a literary dinner party. Which three writers, dead or alive, do you invite?
Haruki Murakami, since it seems unlikely I’ll ever meet him. He can curate the music and cook spaghetti. Carrie Fisher, for her wit and bravura. Lastly, John Berger. I love that Berger gave half his Booker Prize money in 1972 to the Black Panthers, and used the other half to fund the research for his next book on migrant laborers. Berger was the kind of writer we need more of — politically committed, aesthetically serious, always curious.

スポンサーサイト



Comment


    
プロフィール

Yuta

Author:Yuta
FC2ブログへようこそ!




最新トラックバック

月別アーカイブ


FC2カウンター

検索フォーム



ブロとも申請フォーム

QRコード
QR