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自分が読んで興味深く感じた英文記事を中心に取り上げる予定です

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映像化する力

 
語学力を測る目安の一つに「情景を思い浮かべられる」ことをあげていいでしょう。イメージ化できれば内容を理解できていると言えますから。『ハムレット』で王妃がオフィーリアの死を伝えている場面から情景が浮かぶか試してみてください。聞いただけで情景が浮かべばたいしたものですし、読んで情景が浮かんでもすごいと思います。

2分50秒あたりから


3分あたりから


There is a willow grows aslant a brook,
That shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream;
Therewith fantastic garlands did she make
Of crow-flowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples
That liberal shepherds give a grosser name,
But our cold maids do dead men's fingers call them:
There, on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
Clambering to hang, an envious sliver broke;
When down her weedy trophies and herself
Fell in the weeping brook. Her clothes spread wide;
And, mermaid-like, awhile they bore her up:
Which time she chanted snatches of old lauds;
As one incapable of her own distress,
Or like a creature native and indued
Unto that element: but long it could not be
Till that her garments, heavy with their drink,
Pull'd the poor wretch from her melodious lay
To muddy death.

王妃
土手から斜めに柳が生え、
小川の水面に白い葉が映るあたり。
あの子はその枝で豪華な花飾りを作っていました。
金鳳花、刺草、雛菊、それから、
口さがない羊飼いたちが卑しい名前で呼ぶけれど、
純潔な乙女たちは死人の指と呼んでいる紫蘭――
そのすてきな花輪を、垂れた枝にかけようと、
柳によじ登ったとたん、意地の悪い枝が折れ、
花輪もろとも、まっさかさまに、
涙の川に落ちました。裾が大きく広がって、
人魚のように、しばらく体を浮かせて――
そのあいだ、あの子は古い小唄を口ずさみ、
自分の不幸がわからぬ様子――
まるで水の中で暮らす妖精のように。
でも、それも長くは続かず、
服が水を吸って重くなり、哀れ、あの子を
美しい歌から、泥まみれの死の底へ
引きずりおろしたのです。
(日本語は河合祥一郎さんから)

若い頃のヘレナ・ボナム=カーターやケイトウィンスレットがオフィーリアを演じているようですね。有名な「尼寺へ行け」の場面です。





何をしたかったかすでにお分かりでしょうが、ここで絵を確認する前にWikipediaの説明を見てみます。シェイクスピアのセリフよりずっと分かりやすいですね。。。

(Wikipedia)
Theme and elements[edit]
The painting depicts Ophelia, a character from Shakespeare's play Hamlet, singing while floating in a river just before she drowns. The scene is described in Act IV, Scene VII of the play in a speech by Queen Gertrude.[1]
The episode depicted is not seen onstage, but exists only in Gertrude's description. Ophelia has fallen into the river from a tree overhanging it, while gathering flowers. She lies in the water singing songs, as if unaware of her danger ("incapable of her own distress"). Her clothes, trapping air, have allowed her to temporarily stay afloat ("Her clothes spread wide, / And, mermaid-like, awhile they bore her up."). But eventually, "her garments, heavy with their drink, / Pull'd the poor wretch from her melodious lay" down "to muddy death."
Ophelia's death has been praised as one of the most poetically written death scenes in literature.[2]
Ophelia's pose—her open arms and upwards gaze—also resembles traditional portrayals of saints or martyrs, but has also been interpreted as erotic.





もちろん、ミレーの回答が唯一のイメージ化ではないでしょうが、よくあのセリフだけでこれだけのものが描けますね。。。

1月下旬からラファエル前派展が開かれますね。ミレーのオフィーリアも来るようですが、これで3回目だそうですね。

英国のテート美術館ではサイトも充実していて、Ophelia learning resourceなるものがありました。テーマや手法など分かりやすく説明してくれています。

Ophelia learning resource
Ophelia was part of the original Henry Tate Gift in 1894 and remains one of the most popular Pre-Raphaelite works in the Tate’s collection. Shakespeare was a frequent source of inspiration for Victorian painters. Millais’s image of the tragic death of Ophelia, as she falls into the stream and drowns, is one of the best-known illustrations from Shakespeare’s play Hamlet.

John Everett Millais, William Holman Hunt and Dante Gabriel Rossetti were the founding members of a group of artists called the Pre-Raphaelites formed in 1848. They rejected the art of the Renaissance in favour of art before Raphael, Michelangelo and Leonardo (15th -16th centuries). The Pre-Raphaelites focused on serious and significant subjects and were best known for painting subjects from modern life and literature often using historical costumes. They painted directly from nature itself, as truthfully as possible and with incredible attention to detail. They were inspired by the advice of John Ruskin, the English critic and art theorist in Modern Painters (1843-60). He encouraged artists to ‘go to Nature in all singleness of heart.rejecting nothing, selecting nothing, and scorning nothing.’

The Pre-Raphaelites developed techniques to exploit the luminosity of pure colour and define forms in their quest for achieving ‘truth to nature’. They strongly believed that respectable divine art could only be achieved if the artist focused on the truth and what was real in the natural world.


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Yuta

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