fc2ブログ

Uncharted Territory

自分が読んで興味深く感じた英文記事を中心に取り上げる予定です

RSS     Archives
 

「富岡製糸場」 世界文化遺産登録

 

Tomioka Silk Mill | Passing On To Next Generations from Takashi Hirukawa on Vimeo.



「富岡製糸場」 が世界文化遺産に無事登録されることになったようですが、世界遺産登録になったもののYoutubeには英語で富岡製糸場を伝えているものが見つけられませんでした。これだけ英語教育が叫ばれているのに、肝心のところで世界に向けてのアピールができていないような気がしますね。

Tomioka Silk Mill added to World Heritage list
8:31 pm, June 21, 2014
Jiji Press

DOHA (Jiji Press)—UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee decided Saturday to add the Tomioka Silk Mill and related industrial heritage sites in Gunma Prefecture to the U.N. cultural agency’s list of World Heritage sites.

The inscription of the Japanese state-run mill, set up in 1872, and related sites on the World Heritage List were approved at the committee’s 38th session held in the Qatari capital of Doha.

ユネスコのサイトでは以下のようなプレスリリースがありました。

Sites in Iraq, Japan, the Netherlands and Saudi Arabia inscribed on World Heritage List
Doha, 21 June – The World Heritage Committee, meeting in Doha (Qatar) under the Chair of Sheikha Al Mayassa Bint Hamad Bin Khalifa Al Thani, has today inscribed the following sites on the World Heritage List.

以下の4カ所が登録されることがきまったようですが、富岡製糸場の部分を見てみます。

Erbil Citadel (Iraq)
Tomioka Silk Mill and Related Sites (Japan)
Van Nellefabriek (Netherlands)
Historic Jeddah, the Gate to Makkah (Saudi Arabia)

Tomioka Silk Mill and Related Sites (Japan) is an historic sericulture and silk mill complex established in 1872 in the Gunma Prefecture north west of Tokyo. Built by the Japanese Government with machinery imported from France, it consists of four sites that attest to the different stages in the production of raw silk: production of cocoons in an experimental farm; a cold storage facility for silkworm eggs; reeling of cocoons and spinning of raw silk in a mill; and a school for the dissemination of sericulture knowledge. It illustrates Japan’s desire to rapidly adopt the best mass production techniques, and became a decisive element in the renewal of sericulture and the Japanese silk industry in the last quarter of the 19th century. It marked Japan’s entry into the modern, industrialized era, and propelled it to become the world’s leading exporter of raw silk, notably to France and Italy.



スポンサーサイト



Comment


    
プロフィール

Yuta

Author:Yuta
FC2ブログへようこそ!




最新トラックバック



FC2カウンター

検索フォーム



ブロとも申請フォーム

QRコード
QR