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ニューヨークでラーメンがブームというのは日本のテレビでも取り上げています。こちらのブログでもニューヨークのラーメン事情を説明してくれています。





そんな中、先ほどの著者George Soltさんが5月にニューヨークで講演を行っていたようです。

The Slurpy, Messy History of Ramen
Park Avenue Methodist Church
New York, NY
CULINARY HISTORIANS OF NEW YORK PRESENTS
Monday, May 19, 2014

It seems a new ramen shop -- or slurp shop -- opens in every New York City borough every month. Ramen has become the new popular fast food with a cult-like following. These rich, salty, steaming bowls of noodle soup have become an international symbol of the cultural prowess of Japanese cuisine.

Ramen's popularity can be attributed to political and economic change on a global scale. Using declassified U.S. government documents and an array of Japanese sources, George Solt reveals ramen's complex history and traces its meteoric rise from humble fuel for the working poor to international icon of Japanese culture.

Ticket price includes reception and ramen slurping samples.

George Solt is the author of "The Untold History of Ramen: How Political Crisis in Japan Spawned a Global Food Craze" (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2014). He holds a PhD in history from University of California, San Diego, and is Assistant Professor of History at NYU. Solt's work considers the connections between the political economic transformation and social reorganization of Japan in the modern era.

Location:
Park Avenue United Methodist Church
106 East 86th Street (between Park and Lexington)
New York, New York 10028

Time:
6:30 pm Check-in and reception | 7:00 pm Lecture

Fee:
$25 CHNY Members | $22 CHNY Senior & Student Members | $40 Non-Members and Guests | $10 Full-Time Students with ID


この講演についてはニューヨーカーも記事にしていました。

MAY 22, 2014
THE HISTORY OF THE RAMEN NOODLE
POSTED BY SOPHIE BRICKMAN
On Monday evening, the Culinary Historians of New York gathered on Manhattan’s Upper East Side to discuss the political and economic underpinnings of ramen-noodle soup. “Next month’s meeting is called Dethroning the Deceitful Pork Chop, ” a member named Linda Pelaccio reminded the audience of about fifty students, foodies, and septuagenarians from the podium. “But now, Professor George Solt!”

Solt, an assistant history professor at New York University, had been hunched over his notes in the first row. He is thirty-five, with close-cropped hair and a slightly Snoopy-ish air about him. He rose and took in the room; many in attendance were slurping quietly from small bowls of ramen provided by the Harlem restaurant Jin Ramen. Solt chose to open with a caveat: “First off, I don’t know how to cook ramen or where to get the best ramen,” he said. “I’m approaching this from a historical perspective.”


Soltさんは今度はカレーライスを研究しようとしているようです。

Afterward, on the way to the nearby Naruto Ramen, on Third Avenue, Solt was aglow. “So many people showed up!” he said, revealing how lonely a decade of ramen research can be. Perusing the menu at the crowded bar, as woks sizzled and smoked behind the counter, he elaborated on America’s love of the dish. “Sushi became the representative food of Japan in the nineteen-eighties abroad, when Japan was a major business competitor to the U.S.,” he said. “The whole embrace of Japanese popular culture in the last ten years is because Japan is no longer an economic threat. That image got transposed to China. It used to be Japan’s burden.”

Over a bowl of shio (salt) ramen, Solt spoke about moving beyond noodles. He’s now researching the first authentic Indian curry in Japan, a dish markedly different from the sludge-like, bland curried rice introduced by the British Navy during the Meiji era. The spicier version came to Japan in the early twentieth century, largely owing to a revolutionary from British India, who fled to Japan after trying to kill a British viceroy. There, Japanese ultra-nationalists sheltered him as he developed an Indian curry recipe in the back kitchen of a Shinjuku bakery.

“Now, that’s a great story!” Solt said, finishing the last of his ramen. “But, actually, I don’t want to keep doing food. After curry, I don’t know what else there is. Soba? There’s a limit to how long you can do this kind of stuff and take yourself seriously.”
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